Saturday, December 3, 2022
11.2 C
Damascus
Saturday, December 3, 2022

Opinion | Syrians watching Putin’s crimes in Ukraine: ‘Déjà vu’

The Russian regime on September 30, 2015 declared officially its intervention in Syria. No doubt this came with an Arab, regional and international approval, namely by the U.S., major European countries and most importantly Israel. Had it not been for this intervention at that time, the Assad regime would most likely have been besieged and overcome in Damascus. Consequently, the equation completely changed with what has now become the Russian occupation of Syria.

Seven years have passed since Russia’s military intervention during which Putin managed to firmly exercise his grip on the country and expand his influence with 24 military bases and 42 observation points. Russia continues to claim that its intervention in Syria is legitimate until today.

Russia, with all its air war power, never stopped to directly bomb Syrian civilians, targeting vital civilian facilities such as hospitals, schools, and homes, as proven by UN reports and Syrian organizations.

Prior to his invasion of Ukraine, Putin tested more than 200 types of Russian weapons in its assaults on Syrian civilians in Syrian territory

Farhad Shekh Baker

Russia also became a major partner in all subsequent efforts to “resolve” the Syrian crisis, and established itself as the party with the upper hand in Syria. This allowed Russia to gear the so-called negotiations to bring an end to the crisis in Syria to its benefit and in line with its interests, rendering all of them useless to the Syrian people.

It is apparent that Putin’s idea of Russian foreign policy is based on the use of military force as is evident in both Syria and Ukraine

Farhad Shekh Baker

Prior to his invasion of Ukraine, Putin tested more than 200 types of Russian weapons in its assaults on Syrian civilians in Syrian territory and benefited from this experience. Now he is using those weapons as well as others in an effort to seize Ukrainian territory as incredibly courageous Ukrainian forces continue to repel many Russian military strikes. Russia is nibbling on lands that it considers its legitimate right, just as it did in Chechnya and Crimea. It is apparent that Putin’s idea of Russian foreign policy is based on the use of military force as is evident in both Syria and Ukraine.

the Syrian people has a long battle not only with the Assad regime, but with other parties as well, mainly Russia and Iran to name just a few

Farhad Shekh Baker

The relations between Syria and Russia are historic and deeply rooted and cannot be compared with the relations of the rest of the Arab countries with Moscow. Maintaining Bashar Assad’s regime in Syria is a Russian strategic goal to protect its own interests in the Middle East, and thus support its major battle, which is the battle against the influence of the West and America in key geographical positions. Thus, to achieve justice and freedom from tyranny and oppression, the Syrian people has a long battle not only with the Assad regime, but with other parties as well, mainly Russia and Iran to name just a few.

Will the equation in Syria change in light of the results of the Ukrainian-Russian war especially as there is now American support for Ukraine? This question is left for the U.S. administration to answer.

Farhad Shekh Baker
Farhad Shekh Baker
Expert in Ukrainian affairs.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest articles