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Syria’s al-Hommal Well: Layers of history document its civilization

Al-Hommal Well in the Kom Basin; Credit: Swissinfo.ch

Research studies have determined that Homo Erectus emerged from the continent of Africa after much human evolution on that continent. Human fossils dating back approximately two to six million years ago have been exclusively found in Africa. The first humans migrated from Africa to Asia about two million years ago, and from there they entered Europe about one million or one and a half million years ago after which modern human species settled in many parts of the world.

New statistics also suggest that Homo Erectus died at least 35,000 years before the first humans appeared in our current form, called Homo Sapiens.

the Syrian cultural/cognitive identity was formed as a precedent compared to the civilizations that followed it

George Tuma

The breeds that inhabited the Fertile Crescent region (natural Syria) were influenced by the natural environment, and their innate consciousness evolved in tandem with the evolution of plant, animal, and bacterial life providing food resources and life-sustaining environmental changes. The characteristics of phylogenic adaptation and evolution led to the differentiation of the Syrian man from the rest of the members of neighboring migrations. Thus, the Syrian cultural/cognitive identity was formed as a precedent compared to the civilizations that followed it.

An example of the distinction of the Syrian man from others is that the Syrian, about one million and five hundred years ago, dug terraces heading downwards to a deep well at the bottom. This well, known as Well Anouzi in ancient times, is still located in the Kom Basin in the desert of the Levant between Al-Tanf and Deir Ezzor and is known today as al-Hommal Well.

I think that the human being who did not yet have any technical means for finding underground water may have relied on probing the layers of the earth with vibrations issued from the energy field which would bounce back from the water layer in the ground

George Tuma

Until today archaeologists have not addressed the following question: How did man discover the presence of groundwater in this spot, and what were the means that made people sure of this before embarking on the difficult task of digging it, as evidenced by the absence of other pits with which they may have tried to find water in this vast area?

Through my in-depth study of the science of the Bio-Electromagnetic field, I think that the human being who did not yet have any technical means for finding underground water may have relied on probing the layers of the earth with vibrations issued from the energy field which would bounce back from the water layer in the ground. Holistic Medicine considers that this energy is conscious and intelligent and connected to the cosmic energies called life energy.

In 1982, Swiss archaeologists became interested in the Kom Basin beginning with Professor Jean-Marie Le Tensorer, a prehistoric specialist and director of the Basel Institute for Prehistory and Archaeology who had come to the area to work as part of a French excavation team led by Jacques Covan.

Excavations have shown that the Kom Basin was of great importance in prehistoric times, as it provided all the necessities of life for animals such as horses, camels, goats, and cows to plants such as wheat, bananas, and others. The area also contained many excellent-quality flint quarries, which allowed it to be used in the manufacture of various types of weapons and tools earlier than other civilizations that came later.

According to the description of the al-Hommal Well, it was dug to a depth of more than 25 meters through sediment accumulation containing more than 25 archaeological layers

George Tuma

The Syrian-Swiss archaeological mission at al-Hommal Well in the Kom Basin revealed the presence of rare remains of historical eras dating back more than a million and a half years. According to the description of the al-Hommal Well, it was dug to a depth of more than 25 meters through sediment accumulation containing more than 25 archaeological layers, it sits above a plateau between 10 and 12 m high and covers an area of 2 dunams (2000 m²).

The historical importance of al-Hommal Well is due to the fact that it has survived the passage of many periods of time starting from the Paleolithic era in its various stages, including the Yabrodi, the Middle Stone Age, and the Neolithic.

Sediment Accumulation of Successive Geological Eras; Credit: Swissinfo.ch

Consequently, this well is considered to be one of the most important archeological sites in the world due to the valuable and sequential data and information it provides that illustrate the development of the oldest prehistoric cultures.

The excavations also led to discoveries of very important natural and environmental significance, including the discovery of the remains of Homo Arctus, a piece of rhinoceros bone, and a lower jawbone belonging to a lion.

In each archeological layer, specific bones of beauty were found, most of which were from unknown categories. But the unearthing of the bones of a giant camel was the most extraordinary discovery made during the excavation of the al-Hommal Well.

The bones of the giant Syrian camel; Credit: Swissinfo.ch

The most important were parts of the skeleton of a giant camel that exceeded the current camel size by one and a half or two times. Found in the lower section of the well, the remains of the ancient camel bones bear no resemblance to those of past eras.

Credit: George Tuma

The discovery of the giant camel has nullified a long-held misconception that camels have only been present in the MENA region for 10,000 years. The era in which the remains of the giant camel were found is estimated to be between 120,000 and 180,000 BC. Before the discovery of the giant camel, no one knew it existed and it is the only model found in the world.

Credit: Wikipedia Images

Archaeological finds also proved that there was an era, or stage of civilization and culture, characterized by the manufacture of the first type of long narrow blades 250,000 years ago. At the deeper levels of this well, tools made of thick flint fragments were found in an unusually prolific manner, the most important of which is the Librodic scraper, which dates back to the culture of the Libroid phase defined between 180,000 and 150,000 BC.

Above the layers of the Nebrodian stage, it was possible to distinguish the layers of the Himelian stage which were characterized by long manicured blades and bayonets called “Himelian bayonets”, the first effective hunting tools in history.

In fact, archaeological sites in this region have revealed very valuable information about the settlement of prehistoric humans in Syria and the Levant and there is speculation that the first man may have also used this spot as a transit for movement towards Asia and Europe before the region became widely used for trade in what came to be known as the Silk Road in later eras.

Although the investigation is still in its infancy, Professor Jean-Marie Le Tensorer commented on the al-Hommal Well website: “The Kom Basin and the al-Hommal Well are an exceptional and extraordinary site.”

George Tuma
George Tuma
George Tuma is the publisher and chief editor of Medical & Cosmetic Arts Magazine; specialist in Spirituality, Health, and Healing; an Instructor of Electro Cosmetic, Therapy and a Practioner of Holistic Medicine, (Complementary and Alternative). He has published several articles in scientific journals.

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