Tuesday, June 25, 2024
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Damascus
Tuesday, June 25, 2024

The role of Folklore in the Syrian cultural identity

The cultural distinction of a civilization is evident in its architectural style, and the geometric shapes that stem from it, such as domes, arches, engravings on wood, and the colors commonly used in painting buildings, both inside and out. The distinction also applies to clothing and clothing styles in terms of materials, designs, colors, ornamentation, and handicraft.

The Syrian cultural identity is unique in its technical and artistic production which gives it a unique characteristic inherent in the collective consciousness that has accompanied it throughout its ancient history.

The production of the components of cultural identity requires creative skills in which the spiritual stock is reflected by the creation of visual sensory formations which imbue the viewer with the elixir of myths, epics, and feelings innately inherent in the conscience of generations of Syrian ancestors.

It is natural that the arts inherited from previous generations are simple, and tend to have popular innate tendencies and concepts that differ from the newer arts because they have been subject to sophisticated academic standards.

There is a close connection that goes back to what we inherited from the cultural imprints of our ancestors, through the forms of ancient Syrian sculpture, sacred icons, Christian and Islamic miniatures, and even folk arts

We can say that this academic development has not been able to overshadow innate folk art or replace it permanently, but rather it is considered an extension of a creative source rooted in the attempt of individuals to express the collective conscience of the nation, whether it is embodied in painting, photography, sculpture or other arts such as literature, music, dance, acting, and jewelry making.

Because art, with its spontaneity, remained steadfast without being bound by (relatively modern) art schools with rational and abstract scales (making it similar to the art of early childhood) it provides a continuation of instinctive images and visual heritage in terms of the construction of various primitive forms and symbols.

There is a close connection that goes back to what we inherited from the cultural imprints of our ancestors, through the forms of ancient Syrian sculpture, sacred icons, Christian and Islamic miniatures, and even folk arts such as folkloric dance, in which spiritual rituals and Sufi orders, such as the Milawiyya dance and others, are mixed.

Syrians need to preserve their cultural heritage to the point of considering it a sacred trust handed down by their ancestors in order to keep it from being lost

They, in addition to narratives from popular memory, are closely related to historical events and became part of the collective memory, beginning with extraordinary acts immortalized by tales of ancient heroes of war and love, all the way to spoken folk stories that mix realism with touches of superstition with the intention of adding suspense and excitement.

Syrians need to preserve their cultural heritage to the point of considering it a sacred trust handed down by their ancestors in order to keep it from being lost at a time when cultural identities are struggling to survive in the current era.

George Tuma
George Tuma
George Tuma is the publisher and chief editor of Medical & Cosmetic Arts Magazine; specialist in Spirituality, Health, and Healing; an Instructor of Electro Cosmetic, Therapy and a Practioner of Holistic Medicine, (Complementary and Alternative). He has published several articles in scientific journals.

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